Hot English Language & Culture How-Tos

How To: Ask and reply to questions in English

The world of English is a fun and exciting place to be. Learn English with Mr. Duncan as he provides basic grammar instruction and speaks in basic English phrases. Check out this English language tutorial to learn how to ask and reply to questions in English. This language lesson is perfect for ESL students or anyone looking to improve their English skills. So watch this instructional English language video and practice asking and answering questions using English words.

How To: Use "It's + adjective + infinitive" in English

In this video, we learn how to use "It's + adjective + infinitive" in English. To form these sentences, you will use the pattern that is stated above. This is very common in the English language, and you can put whatever you want into the sentence as the infinitive. You can change this from "it's hard to do" to It's not hard to do" to "it's easy to do". You can also make something negative, by giving it the prefix "im", which would change "possible" to "impossible". You can also ad in "un" to...

How To: Understand English phrasal verbs & compound words

The presenter, Ms. Jennifer explains how compound words are formed from phrasal verbs. With examples she explains how the meaning and pronunciation differs when compound words are formed from phrasal verbs. She explains the difference between 'show' and 'show off' by showing her collection of fans, and showing off with one of her beautiful fan from Japan. Then she explains the difference between 'show off' and 'show-off', giving examples and makes the listeners clear about compound nouns also...

How To: Use "live" as a verb & adjective in English

Paul, an English teacher, gives a lesson on the difference between the word "live" as a verb and as an adjective. To make to "v" sound when saying the word, the lower lip has to touch the teeth. "Live" as verb is an action, so you say "I live in Minneapolis". The singular form is "live," and the plural form is "lives". Live" as an adjective is a describing word, so you say "Live TV is fun". "Live"" as an adjective describes the subject of a sentence. "Live" as an adjective can mean something ...

How To: Use the 'stop' verb in the English language

The verb "stop" in the English language can be used with a gerund and an infinitive. The word "stop" has different meanings depending on how it's used. Look at the sentence, "I stopped eating fast food." Stopped is used in the past tense and eating is a gerund, or a word that describes an activity and functions as a noun. Look at the sentence, "I stopped to eat some fast food." In that sentence, there is an infinitive. The first sentence means I no longer eat fast food. The second sentence me...

How To: Use count and mass nouns correctly

Mrthoth will show you how to use, count, and mass nouns correctly. Listen to a sample sentence and try to find the grammatical errors in the sentence. A mass noun ca refers to a whole group of objects, for example you would not say a lot of butter you say a lot of butter. A count noun is basically a noun you can count. You can make it plural and you can put a number in front of it. Like you say it was a lot of pencils.

How To: Use the word 'got' in the English language

In this video it is explained how to use the words "got" "got to" and "gotta'". "Got" is the past tense of the word " get". Sometimes Americans say "have got" in place of "have" or "got" in place of "have". For example there is a sentence "I've got my wallet". Some Americans say "I have my wallet" and some may say "I got my wallet". All of them are correct. "Gotta'" is used in place of "have got to". For example there is a sentence" I have got to go". Some Americans may say

How To: Use imperatives or reporting verbs in English speech

In this tutorial, we learn how to speak English: Imperatives or reporting verbs. Imperative sentences are sentences like "open it!", where you are asking someone to perform an action. You can also say this in a nice fashion, asking "please open it". There are many different forms of imperative sentences, which include: commands/orders, directions, instructions, requests, and warnings. All of these different types of sentences are asking someone to do something, just changing up the way they d...

How To: Use "there", "their", & "they're" properly

There, their and they're all sound the same. There is for location and information. Their is possessive adjective for they. They're is a contraction for they are. The bathroom is over there give the location of the bathroom. Their is used to show ownership. You can show possession through proper names or by use of the word their. Their house is over there shows the possessive "their" and location "there." They're=they are. They're over there. They're at their house. The words and the meanings...

How To: Use the verb "have" for eating and drinking

In this tutorial, we learn how to use the verb "have" for eating and drinking. When someone asks you what you are eating or what you did eat, you will have to use the word "have" to answer or even if you want to ask the question you have. An example of asking something a question like this would be, "what do you usually have for breakfast, lunch or dinner?" Any question with meals will have the word "have" mixed into it, because it's asking what you are going to or have eating in a different ...

How To: Describe situations that didn't happen in the past

This video shows us how to describe the situations that are opposite of the future perfect tense. Here it is shown how to describe the situations that did or did not happen in the past using would, have and past participle. He gives us 3 very good examples that are describing such situations. In these examples he describes a situation which happened in the past which is actually a negative and uses a fact that is described in the present tense to give the reason why that situation ended in a ...

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