How To: Use "It's + adjective + infinitive" in English

In this video, we learn how to use "It's + adjective + infinitive" in English. To form these sentences, you will use the pattern that is stated above. This is very common in the English language, and you can put whatever you want into the sentence as the infinitive. You can change this from "it's hard to do" to It's not hard to do" to "it's easy to do". You can also make something negative, by giving it the prefix "im", which would change "possible" to "impossible". You can also ad in "un" to...

How To: Understand old school hip hop slang

Check out this language video to learn what some old school hip hop slang words really meant. Dr. Dre and Ed Lover let us know what some of these old school hip hop slang used in the Yo! days really meant. Slang terms have a way of coming back so brush up and learn how to speak some old school hip hop slang by watching this Yo! Slanguistics 101 video tutorial.

How To: Learn the English phonetic alphabet

Learn English with Mr. Duncan as he provides basic grammar instruction and speaks in basic English phrases. Check out this English language tutorial to learn the English phonetic alphabet. Some people think that this is a helpful tool for improving spoken English, while others feel that phonetics slows down the process of learning English and makes it dull and boring! Regardless, this language lesson is perfect for ESL students or anyone looking to improve their English pronunciation skills. ...

How To: Use double comparatives in the English language

This is a tutorial segment of Double comparatives of English Grammar. In this lesson, the instructor is explaining about how to express a cause and an effect in a easier way with examples. She says that it’s the relationship where one thing makes a change on another or one factor say for example sunshine, produce a result in another by making us to feel happy. Comparative forms are used to express a cause and effect. Words like brighter, happier are examples for that. For example, in the sent...

How To: Use "live" as a verb & adjective in English

Paul, an English teacher, gives a lesson on the difference between the word "live" as a verb and as an adjective. To make to "v" sound when saying the word, the lower lip has to touch the teeth. "Live" as verb is an action, so you say "I live in Minneapolis". The singular form is "live," and the plural form is "lives". Live" as an adjective is a describing word, so you say "Live TV is fun". "Live"" as an adjective describes the subject of a sentence. "Live" as an adjective can mean something ...

How To: Speak with a Liverpudlian 'scouse' accent

Can you speak like the Beatles? Not bloody likely! Well, you CAN learn to speak with a Liverpudlian accent IF you check out this video and wrap your head and tongue around the words. This accent is a wonderful one and recognized around the world as the dialect spoken by the Fab 4. It almost sounds Scottish, but it's 100% working class England. John Lennon had the best example out of the Beatles of this accent, with George Harrison coming second. Paul and Ringo did not have particularly good L...

How To: Use the word 'got' in the English language

In this video it is explained how to use the words "got" "got to" and "gotta'". "Got" is the past tense of the word " get". Sometimes Americans say "have got" in place of "have" or "got" in place of "have". For example there is a sentence "I've got my wallet". Some Americans say "I have my wallet" and some may say "I got my wallet". All of them are correct. "Gotta'" is used in place of "have got to". For example there is a sentence" I have got to go". Some Americans may say

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