How To: Use infinitives for questions in English

In this tutorial, we learn how to speak English using infinitives for questions. First, you need to be able to identify reported questions inside of a conversation. Infinitives include words like "to go", "to buy", "to find". They are formed by saying "to" + the verb. "Wh" infinitives are simply at the beginning of infinitives, like "where to go", "when to buy", and "how to find". Use infinitives to report questions that have modal verbs such as "should" and "can" depending on what the modal ...

How To: Use the verb "have" for eating and drinking

In this tutorial, we learn how to use the verb "have" for eating and drinking. When someone asks you what you are eating or what you did eat, you will have to use the word "have" to answer or even if you want to ask the question you have. An example of asking something a question like this would be, "what do you usually have for breakfast, lunch or dinner?" Any question with meals will have the word "have" mixed into it, because it's asking what you are going to or have eating in a different ...

How to Speak English: Reported speech with conditionals

In this tutorial, we learn how to speak English with conditionals. Conditional statements need special attention and usually start with the word "if". An example of a conditional statement is "if you want, we'll go out to dinner". This has two parts, a condition, and a result. The condition is expressed by "if". To report them, don't change the verbs unless you're dealing with a real condition. Look and see if verb tenses can change depending on how the sentence is structured. Try to remember...

How To: Use "live" as a verb & adjective in English

Paul, an English teacher, gives a lesson on the difference between the word "live" as a verb and as an adjective. To make to "v" sound when saying the word, the lower lip has to touch the teeth. "Live" as verb is an action, so you say "I live in Minneapolis". The singular form is "live," and the plural form is "lives". Live" as an adjective is a describing word, so you say "Live TV is fun". "Live"" as an adjective describes the subject of a sentence. "Live" as an adjective can mean something ...

How To: Describe problems in English

This video tutorial is in the Language category which will show you how to describe problems in English. When describing problems in English, many people use the word trouble. When you frame a question, you can frame it in the present or the present continuous tense. For example; what do you have trouble with or what are you having trouble with? Similarly, when you answer the question you can use the present or the present continuous tense. Examples of this are; I have trouble with my car or ...

How To: Replace possessive nouns and adjectives with pronoun

In this video, we learn how to replace possessive nouns and adjectives with pronouns. Using pronouns to replace possessive nouns and adjectives is simple, an example includes: Joe's car is dirty, would change to, his car is dirty, or it is dirty. Another example of this is "Sara's shoes are outside" would be "her shoes are outside", or "they are outside". "The workers' lunches are in the refrigerator", would be "their lunches are in the refrigerator", or "they are in the refrigerator". Practi...

How To: Read the poem "Hope is the thing with feathers"

This video tutorial belongs to the Language category which is going to show you how to read the poem "Hope is the thing with feathers". This video is a reading of the poem is by Emily Dickinson. Here is the poem. Hope is the thing with feathers, that perches in the soul and sings the tune without the words and never stops at all and sweetest in the gale is heard. And sore must be the storm, that could abash the little bird that kept so many warm. I've heard it in the chilliest land, and on th...

How To: Practice saying the "t" sound in the middle of words

In words like bottle and mitten, the "t" really isn't a "t" sound; it is more of a "d" sound or a very fast "t" sound. Practice the "t" sound with the words button, carton, brighten, tighten, fatten, eaten, rotten, matter, butter, flutter, water, bottle, settle, and metal. In American English, the "t" sound is very difficult to hear in some words. An example of this is the word butter, where the "t" sounds more like a "d." Remember, the way people speak English in the United States is differe...

How To: Use "It's + adjective + infinitive" in English

In this video, we learn how to use "It's + adjective + infinitive" in English. To form these sentences, you will use the pattern that is stated above. This is very common in the English language, and you can put whatever you want into the sentence as the infinitive. You can change this from "it's hard to do" to It's not hard to do" to "it's easy to do". You can also make something negative, by giving it the prefix "im", which would change "possible" to "impossible". You can also ad in "un" to...

How To: Use reported speech with modals in English

In this video, we learn how to speak English: reported speech with modals. Modal verbs include: must, should, and could. The expressions include: have to and supposed to. By reading the sentences, you will see which words can or cannot be changed. If the word changes the meaning of the sentence, you cannot use it with the sentence. In reported speech, you do not change perfect modals, which are word that are in their past forms. Modal verbs that do change include "can" being switched to "coul...

How To: Use the 'stop' verb in the English language

The verb "stop" in the English language can be used with a gerund and an infinitive. The word "stop" has different meanings depending on how it's used. Look at the sentence, "I stopped eating fast food." Stopped is used in the past tense and eating is a gerund, or a word that describes an activity and functions as a noun. Look at the sentence, "I stopped to eat some fast food." In that sentence, there is an infinitive. The first sentence means I no longer eat fast food. The second sentence me...

How To: Diagram gerunds & gerund phases

For those who don't know, a gerund is a noun whose root word is formed from a verb. Anyone interested in brushing up on their grammar skills should view this video by Yossarian on how to diagram gerunds and gerund phrases. Yossarian uses various sentence examples to break down the subjects and verbs to find gerunds and gerund phrases. Learn how to break down the components of any sentence to find the gerund and gerund phrases by following this video tutorial.

How To: Describe situations that didn't happen in the past

This video shows us how to describe the situations that are opposite of the future perfect tense. Here it is shown how to describe the situations that did or did not happen in the past using would, have and past participle. He gives us 3 very good examples that are describing such situations. In these examples he describes a situation which happened in the past which is actually a negative and uses a fact that is described in the present tense to give the reason why that situation ended in a ...

How To: Use slang from 19th century America

Check out this instructional English language video with Moujan Z. as she talks about slang in 19th century America. This was a colorful period for the American vernacular with references to agriculture, the Civil War, and the frontier. Any ordinary sentence can suddenly be turned into a fun parade. Practice your 19th century American slang with this English language tutorial.

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